D Language R205 Impreza

It’s been a few years since D Language came onto the scene with their R205 Impreza. According to their website, they’re a cooperate IT design and consulting company that started a motor sports division. The whole thing sounds very Japanese and it’s still unclear whether D Language is an actual tuning shop and retailer or just a team of individuals who compete in racing – apparently Tarzan Yamada is (was) one of their sponsored drivers.

Their R205 time attack racer has certainly evolved over the years and is looking more sporty than ever in the latest Varis aero.

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The carbon under tray looks particularly good paired with the canards on the front bumper.

Imprezas have become increasingly less common at Tsukuba Super Battles so it’s nice to see cars like the D Language R205 staying relevant and challenging the competition.

Photo courtesy of Varis.

 

The Journey, Not The Destination

It’s not about the destination, but the journey we take to get there. No truer words could be said about Chris Fontecchio’s 2006 WRX Limited.

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Something has been happening the last few years in the Subaru community. What was once bought solely for a lack of other options has now taken on a legendary status amongst Impreza owners. The GDA was the first iteration of the WRX to be sold in America and for many, the car’s love-hate looks were a point of heated debate. Now however, the car has aged like a fine wine and the bugeye has become one of the most sought after Imprezas. As newer models have gotten chunkier and more cumbersome, the aggressive rally styling of the GDA has put it in the discussion of becoming a future classic. The thought of owning a bugeye is easy enough, but finding one that hasn’t been used and abused is another matter entirely.

What if you didn’t need to find one though, what if you just built your own? That’s exactly what Chris set out to do.

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What started life as a daily driven 2006 WRX Limited has become a track car in the making and the passion project of an owner who does things the old school way. By day, Chris is an engine tech and he’s put all of his knowledge and skill to use building the car himself.

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It’s hard work and the drive to produce a truly unique Impreza that has seen Chris’ car with 2 engine builds and a complete JDM bugeye front end conversion.

What we have here could be the ideal GD Impreza – bugeye looks with an updated interior and all the benefits of a built (2006) STI EJ257.

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Under the hood lies an EFI Logics tuned EJ257 short block with 255 heads and 257 cams. A Garrett GTX3076R aids the car in achieving 341 whp and 326 tq at 19 psi.

The attention to detail on Chris’ Impreza is truly stunning and the selection of parts even more so. It’s a conversation we’ve had time and time again on ACLASS and in this age of knockoffs, taking the time to source the real deal deserves proper admiration.

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For now the interior remains fully intact with some upgrades including a very plush Prova alcantara steering wheel which Chris calls the best mod, hands down. The alcantara trimmed, full interior may eventually give way to a roll cage as the car takes on more track day duties.

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As nice as the interior is, it’s the exterior that really sets off this Impreza’s looks. The car has been repainted with 3 coats of European WRB for a shine that’s a slightly darker than standard. To protect the new paint job, Chris has had 70% of the exterior wrapped in clear bra to prevent rock chips. Up front an STI V2 front lip has been custom molded to be seamless, while JDM side spats round off the new look. At the back, a Do-Luck carbon trunk adds subtle sportiness.

It’s the kind of exterior I love because it’s a car that truly appeals to enthusiasts. To the untrained eye, Chris’ Impreza could be just another sports sedan, but to those who know, the car is full of details waiting to be discovered.

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So where does the journey go from here? It continues forever of course. Chris will never sell the car and probably never finish it. The exterior is on pause for now while he focuses on power and handling. Despite it’s flawless condition, this is a car that gets used both on the street and at the track.

I’m always going on about the complete build – a car that perfectly blends looks with performance because one cannot exist without the other. Chris continues to succeed with this in a way few other Subaru owners are. This is a project both old and new Subaru owners can be excited about for many years to come because like wine, it will only keep getting better with age.

A big thank you to Chris Fontecchio for reaching out over Instagram and sharing his car with me! Check out the comments section for the full parts list.

Photos courtesy of Serg Rangel.

2014 Hungarian Grand Prix

We all watch Formula 1 because we want to see the most skilled drivers in the world do what they do best. Today’s Hungarian Grand Prix give us so much of that and more.

F1 Grand Prix of Hungary - Previews

12 miles outside of Budapest stands the Hungaroring, a venue that’s been somewhat lost in a long pecking order of Formula 1 Grands Prix. However it’s at this small, twisty track where we’ve seen some of the very best driving on the calendar – today was no exception and may go down as the most exciting race we’ve seen in  2014.

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Today’s race was really about 3 stars defying the odds and digging deep. Daniel Ricciardo, who’s taken the challenge of driving for a top flight team and owned it with class. Lewis Hamilton, who after another mechanical meltdown in qualifying, started from pit lane for the second week in a row. Fernando Alonso, who’s struggled all season with another skittish creation from the Scuderia. In many ways these 3 drivers, above all others, should be fighting at the front of the pack every Sunday.

F1 Grand Prix of Hungary

F1 Grand Prix of Hungary

For the casual Formula 1 fan, Daniel Ricciardo has come from virtually nowhere. There were a lot of discussions coming into the season over how Ricciardo would handle the move up from Toro Rosso. Would he make his own mark or would he succumb to the pressures of being Vettel’s number 2? Those questions were answered early on in the season and he’s since become the dominant driver at Red Bull. While his teammate has continued to struggle with the new V6 power units and a less than ideal RB10 chassis, Ricciardo has made the car work for him and been all smiles throughout the process. The Australian has proven all season long that he has every right to be up front battling World Champions, as exhibited last weekend in Germany and today in Hungary. He’s the dark horse of Formula 1 right now and could be the biggest threat to the 1-2 punch of Mercedes. With Alonso’s endorsement, the Scuderia will surely be seeing what they can do to coax the Australian into a future contract.

F1 Grand Prix of Hungary

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Lewis Hamilton can’t seem to catch a break lately and has been experiencing Felipe Massa levels of bad luck. After a brilliant drive from pit lane to a podium finish at Hockenheim, it was déjà vu in Budapest after his car was engulfed in flames during Saturday’s Q1. Sunday would see another start from pit lane for Hamilton and another pole for his teammate Nico Rosberg. It’s been hard to argue the conspiracy theorists over German favoritism at the Mercedes camp, but in reality what good would the team favoring Rosberg actually do? Hamilton over the years has been a driver of extremes – epically fast, skilled and riddled with bad luck. On the notoriously tight and difficult to pass Hungaroring, Hamilton yet again drove to epic levels, navigating his way through the field to take the fight up front. Midway through the race, he was ordered to let his teammate through. It was a strange request considering Rosberg was over a second behind at the time. Hamilton challenged the order and didn’t relinquish the position, which probably saved him later in the race.

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Despite epic drives from Ricciardo and Hamilton, it was Fernando Alonso who was the true hero in Hungary. Alonso managed only his second podium of the season, but it was as good as a win for the Scuderia who have struggled all season long. The 2nd place finish was hard fought and Alonso managed one hell of a stint for 10 laps on ruined tires. Despite the car, Alonso manages to pull 110% from it every race weekend, it really is astounding. Some of the other, more vocal drivers on the grid should be talking notes on how it’s done. The way he managed to hold off 2 superior cars for as long as he did was world class and hopefully the beginning of many more podium finishes for Alonso this season.

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F1 Grand Prix of Hungary

Weather played a major role in today’s race and tire strategy was crucial. Some teams like Mercedes got it right, while others namely McLaren did their drivers in on poor strategies. Given the conditions, there were real possibilities Jenson Button could’ve been fighting up front at the end of the race, however a bad call from the team to put him on inters ruined any hopes of a podium. Others lost control entirely and suffered major crashes including Lotus’ Romain Grosjean and Force India’s Sergio Perez. Neither of the Force India cars finished, closing the door on the long running points streak Nico Hulkenberg had.

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Jenson Button in the pit lane.

A disheveled Nico Rosberg looked to have been crying prior to the media scrum following the race. The reality is that the German is an inferior driver to his teammate, he just has the good fortune of driving the most competitive car on the grid. Given the field were completely equal in terms of performance, Rosberg would contend for a spot in the top 10, but not be fighting up front. Should he win the WDC this year, it’s likely to be a 1 and done. The true stars of the show were alive and well in Hungary. It was a battle between 3 of the most naturally gifted drivers in international motor sport and it was quite a show.

F1 Grand Prix of Hungary

F1 Grand Prix of Hungary

We’re past the halfway mark of the 2014 season – it’s absolutely flown by hasn’t it? The annual summer holiday will take us through the end of August to some of the sport’s truly epic Grands Prix at Spa Francorchamps and Monza. In the meantime, bravo Hungary!

Photos courtesy of F1 Fanatic.

The Gift Of Winning

Conspiracy theories are usually a complete waste of time. However, it’s hard to ignore what’s been playing out at Mercedes the last few weekends.

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For the second consecutive week, Lewis Hamilton has suffered major reliability issues in qualifying. Meanwhile his teammate Nico Rosberg has clinched pole position.

Earlier this week, rumors of Mercedes courting Sebastian Vettel surfaced. While that’s probably a long shot, it would be in the team’s best interests to have a German World Champion.

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Tomorrow should be an interesting show. The Hungaroring is a notoriously difficult track to pass on and Hamilton certainly has his work cut out starting from the back of the pack.

Last week I suggested that Hamilton would leave Mercedes should Rosberg clinch the WDC. That outcome is looking more and more likely, especially as the inferior driver of the two continues to dominate the sport with faultless reliability.

Photos courtesy of F1 Fanatic.

Rev Them To 15000

Everyone is moaning about Formula 1 again. There are plenty of opinions on how to fix it, but much like everything these days, the sport has become overly complicated. Can we just get back to basics?

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Lets stay away from rules like the absurdity of standing restarts. If the last 2 race weekends weren’t enough proof as to why that’s a terrible idea, the sport deserves to ruin itself.

What we’re more concerned with is the show itself. The buzzword around the paddock and media circles is spectacle. Apparently, the spectacle is what’s been missing from Fomula 1 in 2014 and the new technical regulations are only making matters worse. As a result, a whole slew of terrible solutions including titanium skid plates, to help generate sparks, have been written into the rules for 2015. These temporary fixes will be good at attracting the fair weather fan, but they come off as inauthentic to the serious fans and will do little to keep them hanging around if the overall product doesn’t improve.

What Formula 1 needs to do is allow the current engines to redline at their intended 15000 rpm.

What has really damaged the product in 2014 is the lack of noise on track. Watching a motor race in person is a completely different experience than watching it at home, which is actually far better. At home you get more information, are able to see all of the on track battles unfold and generally don’t miss a single lap of the race – unless you’re watching NBCSN. At the track there are other, more sensory experiences that make up for the lack of racing you get to see. One of those major advantages is hearing the cars in person. If you’ve ever been to an air show or any kind of motor race, you’ll know precisely that other-worldly feeling of shock and awe that can only be achieved through sound. Hearing any open wheel race car at WOT is a mesmerizing, joyous experience.

Formula 1 has always been the global purveyor of such sound-related bliss and in 2014 that’s all gone away and with it, the attendance on Sundays. Without the sound the sport no longer seems so exciting and so dangerous. Formula 1’s ticket prices are astronomically expensive and it’s a difficult sell outside of the diehard fans so if people are spending the money, the product better be excellent.

Some teams have tried to respond to criticism about the new sound of Formula 1. Mercedes were seen testing trumpeted exhaust earlier in the season with little effect. Right now the cars’ V6 turbos are redlining between 10-11000 rpm, however changing their tuning configurations would give the cars an additional 4-5000 rpm. The extra revs would produce much of the high-pitched wailing people have been calling for all season.

So why hasn’t it been done already?

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The answer is simple, tire degradation and fuel savings. Under the current technical regulations, the cars must maintain a certain fuel flow throughout the race.

Somewhere along the line, the FIA and Formula 1 decided they needed to become more “road relevant”. The more the sport adheres to an environmentally friendly approach, the more automotive manufacturers (like Honda) will want to become involved with the sport. New manufacturers will attract new sponsors which means more money for Bernie.

Open wheel racing was never intended to be road relevant and it never will be. There is very little to do with a Formula 1 car that you’ll find in your own garage. These machines are so specialized that even the most mundane of adjustments could adversely effect the entire car’s performance. For as much as sport is about competition, it’s also about entertainment. You would be kidding yourself to think otherwise. That being said. part of what has always made Formula 1 so entertaining, is the immense competition – the best drivers in the world racing in the best machines that money can buy. Environmental preservation will never be entertaining and at the end of the day, it’s not motor racing’s battle to wage. The sooner that’s realized, the sooner we can all get back to enjoying Formula 1 without all of the gimmicks.

2014 German Grand Prix

Today’s German Grand Prix marked the halfway point in a 2014 Formula 1 season dominated by Mercedes AMG Petronas.

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The Hockenheimring played host to Round 10 of the World Championship but you wouldn’t have guessed much was at stake by the thousands of empty seats around the track. FOM have taken considerable criticism in recent months over the absurd prices they’re charging for tickets. Given that Germany is one of the wealthiest and most motorsport-crazed countries on the calendar, the lack of attendance further raises criticism.

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On the heels of the German National Football Team’s World Cup dominance, the Formula 1 media made sure the attention was on Nico Rosberg, who was coming off of a retirement at Silverstone. The driver has been particularly vocal about half German heritage in the last few weeks and it became one of the primary story lines in the weeks leading up to the Grand Prix. Ultimately Rosberg did his do diligence and took the first “home” victory of his career. Most have been under the impression the Monaco was Rosberg’s home race, but apparently he drives for Germany. The whole thing is very confusing as Lewis Hamilton illustrated in the press earlier in the week – “He is German-Finnish-Monaco-esque, or whatever.”

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Things didn’t fare so well for Hamilton on Saturday as he suffered a catastrophic failure of his right front brake caliper, which sent him into the barriers during Q2. He started the race from P20 and executed one hell of a drive, navigating a difficult field to ultimately finish on the podium in 3rd. Hamilton looked dejected during the podium ceremony, as he often does when the result isn’t a win.

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The tension in the Mercedes paddock has clearly boiled over and it appears both drivers are barely on speaking terms. It does seem awfully odd that Hamilton has been receiving the brunt of the bad luck this season, in terms of reliability and slow pitstops. Despite a retirement for Rosberg at Silverstone, the rest of his season has gone without incident. It’ll be interesting to see how the remainder of 2014 plays out for both drivers. Judging by the recent long-term contract extension for Rosberg and the overwhelming support of the team, Hamtilon will certainly feel as if he’s playing second fiddle at Mercedes.

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Elsewhere on the grid, more horrible luck for Williams and Felipe Massa. Massa can’t seem to catch a break this season and Germany marks the third Grand Prix in a row where he’s been involved in a crash. Luck wasn’t on his side at Silverstone as he became the collateral damage of Kimi Raikkonen’s off, but unfortunately heading into turn 1 at Hockenheim, Massa left McLaren’s Kevin Magnussen nowhere to go, which resulted in one of the worst looking crashes of 2014 and saw the Williams FW36 sliding on its top side.

Massa claims to have done nothing wrong, but this wouldn’t be the first time the Brazilian has refused to take responsibility. At times his mistakes have seemed very questionable for such a veteran racer. With the Mercedes-powered FW36 performing so well, Massa has all the opportunities to win races if he can keep himself out of harm’s way.

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His teammate Valtteri Bottas has been making increasing waves recently and started from P2 after an excellent Q3 on Saturday. Ailing tires in the final laps of the race did nothing to favor Bottas, who still managed to hold off a charging Hamilton to finish 2nd. It was a consistently solid performance from start to finish for the Finn.

F1 Grand Prix of Germany - Previews

GP GERMANIA F1/2014

The real show of the day was an excellent bout between the F14 T of Fernando Alonso and the RB10 of Daniel Ricciardo. Germany was the second Grand Prix in a row where Alonso did what he does best against Red Bull Racing.

F1 Grand Prix of Germany

After Vettel’s petulant whining over the job of battling Alonso at Silverstone, it was a breath of fresh air to see Ricciardo take the challenge in stride and put up an honorable fight against the Ferrari. With the increasing levels of gimmicks being added to the sport and the FIA’s absurd desire for more “road relevancy”, these kinds of battles will continue to be a rarity.

GP GERMANIA F1/2014

Recently, Luca di Montezemolo called the drivers “taxi drivers” because the sport requires them to structure their races around fuel and tire savings. There’s a reason it’s called racing and fans want to see the very best drivers in the world going at the absolute limit for 58 laps. If refueling and longer lasting tires are required to do that, than so be it. Environmentalists have no shortage of other causes to seek out in place of exercising their blame game culture on international motorsport.

F1 Grand Prix of Germany

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With the summer break looming, the teams will have to make the tough choice of fighting until the end of the season or throwing in the towel on 2014. Outside of Mercedes, Red Bull and Williams, it’s likely most teams will choose the latter. Despite Alonso’s best efforts on Sundays, the F14 T has been another misstep for Ferrari. The same can be said for McLaren, who have been historically bad the last 2 seasons. Neither of Formula 1’s winningest teams will want to carry on like this in 2015, which is why early development will likely take the priority.

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The Hockenheimring may have played host to it’s last German Grand Prix. With their FOM contract expiring, it’s likely the event will remain at the Nürburgring annually. It wouldn’t be a huge loss to the sport as the track’s changed layout diminished everything that made it so brilliant in the first place. Today’s foibles by the stewards were highly unacceptable and a far cry from the Germany’s stereotypical efficiency. The safety car absolutely should’ve been deployed after Adrian Sutil’s Sauber became stranded on the home straight during lap 47. The trackside marshalls were also very slow to respond and it’s this level of confusion than can be so dangerous for the other drivers. The fact that the FIA can overlook incidents like this, while trying to enforce more “road relevant” cars shows just what a fractured and outlandish organization Jean Todt is running.

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F1 Grand Prix of Germany

The teams head to Budapest this week for the Hungarian Grand Prix next Sunday. The Hungaroring is a track where Lewis Hamilton and Jenson Button have done well historically so next weekend should be very interesting indeed.

Photos courtesy of F1 Fanatic.

An Ode To The Original

Once Jalopnik does one of their “buy this now” posts, it’s already too late. Earlier this year, it was classic 911s, then the E46 M3 and most recently the original Impreza GC.

It’s becoming ever more difficult to find an Impreza 2.5 RS in good shape. Most have been poorly modified, abused or a combination of the two. While most GC owners opt for more aggressive, WRC and track day looks, t3hWIT has gone a different route by channeling the original WRX STI RA.

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It’s a brilliant take on a classic and in many owner’s opinions, the true embodiment of the Impreza.

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A nod to Colin McRae on the rear wing.

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th3WIT’s car helps to explain why the Impreza is so unique. Unlike most other performance cars, the are 2 very distinctive camps in which it resides – rally and track. Having had great success in both arenas, Subaru owners have had a difficult decision when they arrive at the fork in the road of which route to take with their builds. Many GC owners in particular go the rally path. It’s what makes the Subaru community so unique in the way that one car is able to adopt so many different personalities. Go to any Subaru meet and you’re likely to find lifted off-road ready WRXs sharing the same space as their slammed, tucked, and caged counterparts.

However this particular car incapsulates something a bit different – heritage. There are no front lips, fancy forged wheels, wide fenders or aftermarket trim pieces, it’s just an honest representation of the best Subaru OEM had to offer at the time. As the GC continues to get older, the word classic will start getting thrown around more. These are the kind of builds that people will be gravitating towards at their local Saturday morning coffee meets.

Photos courtesy of th3WIT.