Renault

Renault Plays It Safe With A Boring New F1 Livery

Renault marked its return to Formula 1 with a new driver lineup and a completely uninspired “launch” livery earlier today. The factory team is back in the sport for the first time since 2011 after taking over the struggling Lotus team.

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The Renault factory team and the prospect its iconic yellow livery making a return to Formula 1 was very exciting news at the end of 2015. In recent years the grid has become a black and white film with varying shades of grey, Renault yellow would’ve injected some much needed technicolor.

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Unfortunately that probably won’t be the case. Much in the same way McLaren-Honda teased hints of day-glo last season, Renault have played it safe by keeping things more neutral. The gesture probably serves as an effort to leave as much blank canvas for sponsors as possible.

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While the fact that it’s a launch livery could signal changes come the start of the season, it’s just another small letdown where the current conservative, corporate climate of the sport overrules fun. In much the same way drivers have been barred from changing their helmet designs throughout the season, Formula 1’s liveries offer no creativity and it’s a shame.

Photos courtesy of F1 Fanatic & Renault.

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2015 Bahrain Grand Prix

Last year’s Bahrain Grand Prix proved to be one of the most exciting races of 2014 when the Mercedes teammates battled head-to-head, resulting in a win for Lewis Hamilton. Sunday’s event didn’t have quite the same spectacle, but the chess match between Mercedes and Ferrari is becoming ever more interesting as the sport heads to Europe.

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F1 - BAHRAIN GRAND PRIX 2015

Much of the talk this week centered around accusations of Hamilton’s strategy made by Nico Rosberg following the Chinese Grand Prix. In an effort to save his tires, Hamilton reduced his pace putting Rosberg on the defensive to a charging Sebastian Vettel in the Ferrari. It was a clear sign that not only was Rosberg beginning to succumb to the pressure, but Ferrari were bringing the fight to Mercedes.

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A much more reserved Rosberg showed up in Bahrain this weekend and it was clear he would need to let his driving do the talking. After an excellent showing in qualifying on Saturday, it was Vettel who shared the front row with Hamilton in pole. Rosberg and Kimi Raikkonen rounded out the top 4. Contrary to what many, including Mercedes had suggested, both drivers followed the same strategy in Sunday’s race.

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The start saw Ferrari on the offensive with Raikkonen outpacing Rosberg for 3rd. The remainder of the race would be a tire strategy battle that saw Vettel taking a similar course to the Mercedes drivers doing 2 stints on the softs and finishing on the mediums. Raikkonen on the other hand ran his second stint on the mediums and finished on the softs. It was a strategy that ultimately paid off brilliantly and put the Ferrari driver in a position to exploit Rosberg, who cooked his brakes into turn 1 on lap 56. Raikkonen who was outpacing both Mercedes at that point finished 2nd, his first podium of the season. Vettel’s luck wasn’t as good and after a misstep off track damaged his front wing causing the German to head back to the pits for a replacement. The stop left Vettel behind the Williams of Valtteri Bottas who was having none of the Ferrari. Vettel’s mistake ultimately had him finishing in 5th.

GP BAHRAIN F1/2015

GP BAHRAIN F1/2015

Ferrari executed a brilliant strategy with Raikkonen and his unbelievable pace on the medium tires made for a well deserved podium finish. In many ways Mercedes dodged a bullet on Sunday when during the final lap, Hamilton began having brake issues. Reliability has been a factor for Mercedes before and with Ferrari’s pace, they will be there to exploit each and every opportunity as the season progresses. For every bit as good as Vettel and Raikkonen have been so far this season, Maurizio Arrivabene and James Allison are also hugely responsible for the Ferrari turnaround.

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F1 Grand Prix of Bahrain

Elsewhere on the track it was more of a GP2 race than anything that corresponded with the battle up front. Apart from Williams, none of the other teams have been able to match the pace of Ferrari in an attempt to challenge the World Champions. After qualifying 6th, Felipe Massa started the race from pit lane but managed to finish 10th after an excellent recovery drive. Daniel Riccardo showed some pace in the Red Bull who’s Renault power unit went kaput meters before the finish line. Christian Horner and Adrian Newey must be loving this very public display of Renault’s “reliability”. You have to feel for Ricciardo who had one hell of a 2014 season. Now he has the opportunity to lead Red Bull and the team are threatening to pull out of the sport completely.

F1 Grand Prix of Bahrain - Practice

F1 Grand Prix of Bahrain

Fernando Alonso on track.

In a very predictable, no less disappointing series of events, Jenson Button was unable to start Sunday’s race due to an ERS failure. McLaren Honda said that had Button started he would have been unable to finish the Bahrain Grand Prix. It’s been an uphill battle for McLaren Honda who have somehow managed to become one of the most likable teams in Formula 1 purely because of how well they’re rolling with the punches. As Red Bull are all too willing to complain to anyone who will listen, the Woking outfit have kept their heads down and steadily improved their pace every race weekend. As any fan of the sport will tell you, seconds equal years in Formula 1 and there’s something to be said about Fernando Alonso finishing just one place (11th) outside of the points on Sunday. What McLaren Honda need is testing and although that won’t happen, the European leg of the season should tell a very different story as the team receives upgrades from the factory and continues to dial in the new chassis.

GP BAHRAIN F1/2015

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GP BAHRAIN F1/2015

Overall the Bahrain Grand Prix was an interesting strategic exercise for Mercedes and Ferrari. How fantastic did the sparks look on track? They’re gimmicky yes, but no doubt improve the look of Formula 1. The flyaway races are over for now as the teams head back to Europe for the summer. Can you believe Monaco is nearly a month away? It’s hard to believe how fast this season is moving. See you in Barcelona at the Spanish Grand Prix in 3 weeks.

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Photos courtesy of F1 Fanatic.

2014 Toro Rosso STR9

Testing at Jerez begins this week and Toro Rosso was there to debut the 2014 STR9.

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Some have suggested this is a prelude to what we’ll be seeing from Red Bull later this week. I hope not.

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Yeah… Welcome to Formula 1 2014. Elitists who are above the kind of humor these new cars have spawned are quick to point out that the designs are all in the name of safety. Don’t get me wrong, having lower noses as a precaution to any t-bone related head injuries is crucial, but there must be a better way. Don’t think for a second that the jokes aren’t flooding throughout the paddock either. It’s tough to escape, especially with the STR9. Something tells me that Jean-Eric Vergne and Daniil Kvyat were looking to get this launch over with quickly.

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Things get a little more sane towards the rear of the car.

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At the back, STR begins their new engine partnership with Renault after parting ways with Ferrari. The new single exhausts on the 2014 cars should give us a nice light show come Bahrain and Singapore.

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More from Jerez in the coming days. Photos courtesy of F1 Fanatic.

The 2013 Japanese Grand Prix

Today’s Japanese Grand Prix at Suzuka Circuit produced the kind of unpredictability and tension that have been lacking from the sport in recent months. Despite another Vettel win, the rest of the field was very much up for grabs.

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Spa-Francorchamps may have the must stunning backdrop and Monza the most interesting heritage, but Suzuka without a doubt, has to be the most exciting circuit in Formula 1. Beloved by the drivers and fans, Suzuka Circuit was originally intended as a test track for Honda (which they still use today). The track was designed in 1962 by John Hugenholtz and features an out and back, figure-8 design. Suzuka is a brilliant mix of high speed straights, flowing S-curves and tight hairpins. Its design can yield high rewards for the most precise drivers, however making a mistake can prove costly, as we all witnessed throughout the weekend.

F1 Grand Prix of Japan - Race

Sebastian Vettel arrived in Japan with the Driver’s Championship all but clinched and would’ve been crowned today, had it not been for a 4th place finish by Fernando Alonso. Red Bull Racing’s prowess experienced a few glitches early in the weekend with a KERS problem on Vettel’s RB9. The absence of KERS may have given Mark Webber the break he needed as he secured his first pole since Korea in 2012.

2013 Japanese Grand Prix - Sunday

The RB9s of Webber and Vettel had lackluster starts from the front row. Amidst the scramble, Vettel made contact with the W04 of Lewis Hamilton past the pit exit. A solid performance from Webber however was not enough and a change in tire strategy saw him pit 3 times and eventually lose P1 to his teammate. Following the race, Webber kept things upbeat but there was little doubt his team let him down. After pitting for the first time in lap 12, Webber was back in on lap 26 which meant a 3rd stop was all but certain. Had the engineers kept the driver out for another 5 laps, Webber likely would’ve taken the car to the end and won his first Grand Prix of the season. A 2nd place finish was the best consolation for Webber, but a disappointing result in contrast to a win that should’ve been his. It was interesting to hear the panic in Vettel’s voice during radio transmissions as he was held up in traffic towards the end. With Romain Grosjean and Webber shrinking the gap, Vettel’s response was a departure from his usually calculated demeanor.

2013 Japanese Grand Prix - Sunday

The day saw another fantastic drive from Romain Grosjean in the Lotus. After an excellent start from P4, he took the lead into turn 1 and proved to be a difficult challenge for Webber throughout the race. It’s been a massive evolution for Grosjean over the last 12 months. In 2012, he was branded a lunatic by his rivals after causing numerous racing incidents. Fast forward to 2013 and Grosjean is beginning to exhibit the level of skill and maturity that Lotus will need in a leader following the departure of Kimi Raikkonen next season.

2013 Japanese Grand Prix - Sunday

The unpredictable nature of racing at Suzuka provided some excellent shuffling across the field. Nico Hulkenberg and his Sauber teammate Esteban Gutierrez were quick all weekend and out drove the likes of McLaren and Scuderia Ferrari for much of the race. Gutierrez achieved a stunning 7th place finish with his teammate Hulkenberg just a head in 6th.

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Hulkenberg has become one of the heroes of Formula 1 and there are rumblings that he’s close to inking a deal with Lotus for 2014. The combination of the German and Romain Grosjean would be fantastic to watch and a great opportunity for Hulkenberg who’s never gotten the big break he so deserves.

GP GIAPPONE F1/2013

Fernando Alonso’s frustration with Scuderia Ferrari continued throughout the weekend. While it seemed unlikely he would ever leave the team, never say never. The F138 continues to struggle against its rivals from Mercedes and Red Bull Racing and a much deserved 4th place finish was the best Alonso could do at Suzuka.

GP GIAPPONE F1/2013

His teammate Felipe Massa performed well in qualifying and started from P5. Ultimately he secured the final World Championship point finishing 10th overall.

Penalties and mechanical errors contributed in large part to a disappointing weekend for Mercedes. Lewis Hamilton qualified behind the Red Bull’s on Saturday, just before sharing a stone-soaked handshake with rival Vettel.

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Despite Hamilton’s PR-friendly Twitter feed, his dissatisfaction with Mercedes’ performance is written all over his face. Hamilton suffered another blow today after getting clipped by Vettel at the start of the race. A tire puncture sent him to the pits after lap 1 and the subsequent damage to the W04’s brakes ended his hopes prematurely.

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His teammate Nico Rosberg was handed a drive-through penalty after leaving the pits early and nearly colliding with the incoming Sergio Perez. The penalty contributed to an 8th place finish and not the kind of result Mercedes were looking for.

Jenson in his cockpit

As beloved by the Japanese fans as Jenson Button and McLaren are, their support did little for the team who are in their worst slump in over 20 years. Button spent a majority of today’s race trading places with his teammate Sergio Perez, who was unable to break into Q3 on Saturday.

Sergio in action

McLaren have declined to answer questions about their driver lineup in 2014 but at the moment no one is safe. While it’s likely Button will continue on with the team, Perez’s fate is more uncertain.

F1 Grand Prix of Japan - Race

Overall an entertaining Japanese Grand Prix and one that fans certainly needed. It’s unlikely the rest of the season’s “Tilkedomes” will provide the same brand of racing and Vettel will certainly get his crown by Abu Dhabi. On the other side of things, inconsistent calls from the stewards continue to plague the sport. At some point they forgot it’s called “racing” and an emphasis on safety and over policing the drivers have many up in arms. Today’s controversial penalties provided for some very candid and blunt driver interviews in the media scrum following the race.

Motor Racing - Formula One World Championship - Japanese Grand Prix - Practice Day - Suzuka, Japan

There are just 4 races to go in this 2013 season! Formula 1 heads to the Buddh International Circuit in 2 weeks for the Indian Grand Prix.

Photos courtesy of F1 Fanatic.

The Great Sound Debate In Formula 1

2014 will mark a new technical era in Formula 1 with the reintroduction of turbocharged V6 engines. As car manufacturers move away from high displacement in favor of more economical setups, it makes sense that Formula 1 would follow a similar path. The switch will also invite new manufacturers to join the sport with Honda and Hyundai rumored to enter in 2015. From a business perspective, the new technical regulations make sense, however there are worries that the sport will loose some of its spectacle.

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The unique and at times violent roar of Formula 1 cars has always played an important role in the sport. The Ferrari V12s of the early 90s produced a sound heard nowhere else before or since. Many including Bernie Ecclestone, are worried that the muted tones of forced induction will turn some fans away from the sport.

Many will recall the first turbo era of Formula 1 in the 80s. The manufacturers used 6-cylinder engines not unlike what we’ll see in 2014 and the roar of their turbos’ external wastegates, provided an equally menacing soundtrack to the V10s and V12s to follow. The inline 6 turbocharged engines from BMW where known to be the most power Formula 1 has ever seen – rumored to produce nearly 1500 HP and 65 PSI in qualifying trim. While the 2014 cars will max out at around 750 HP, there’s still the potential for them to sound fantastic.

The sport’s engine manufacturers are already hard at work completing the new V6s and their sound has been a closely guarded secret. However Eccelstone has complained about the sound and even suggested the use of artificial enhancements, to make things more exciting for spectators. While Formula 1 purists will scoff at that mere suggestion of artificial noise, no one really knows what to expect. No official videos have been released of the new engine sound, however one YouTube user has produced some possibilities of what we might hear in 2014.

Each engine sound has been modified to rev to 15000 RPM which will be the limit in 2014. While the modified VR38 from the GT-R sounds exciting, the actual sound may be closer to the modified Alfa 155 DTM. It’s unlikely the turbochargers will feature external wastegates which are largely responsible for the roar of the cars in the 80s. They will also be producing significantly less boost in favor of an Energy Recovery System.

The 2014 regulations all seem a bit complicated however they’re a reflection of what we’re seeing on production cars these days. BMW is one manufacturer known for pumping artificial engine noise through the speakers of their M cars. Even Mercedes are shying away from their iconic V8s in favor of more economical turbo setups.

Despite my initial reservations, I’m excited for the new turbo era of Formula 1. With added boost we may be treated to less traction in the bends. The new ERS will also provide an additional 150 HP at the touch of a button. It will increase the potential for overtaking and make for better racing in general. While the simulations are all very entertaining, my hope is that we’ll be hearing this in 2014.

Videos courtesy of ngendro & CarniftyTV.

Building Bricks

Legos where and always will be my favorite toy. If I wasn’t into spending my money on cars, clothes, and gadgets I’d probably buy Lego sets and build them all day. I regularly visit this cool Lego blog called Klocki, Polish for bricks. It features all kinds of amazing Lego creations from around the world. I used to think I was pretty good at building Legos when I was younger, but there’s always someone out there that spends more time on it and does it bigger and better. I’m regularly amazed by the things I see on Klocki. Check out this awesome Renault Alpine a442 made completely out of Legos!

The engine details are incredible!  I love the chrome exhaust pipes and little gauges in the cockpit.

This is one of the best Lego car builds I’ve come across, truly impressive. Go visit Klocki and be inspired!